ACHRNEWS

Sept. 25, 2006: Parents Voice Concerns in Survey on School IAQ

September 25, 2006
ROSWELL, Ga. - Increased absenteeism. Decreased concentration levels. Declines in academic performance. According to a national survey, these represent some of the areas of concern voiced by parents of school-aged children that can result from poor IAQ in schools.

Conducted by Opinion Research Corp. on behalf of Kimberly-Clark Filtration Products, the survey revealed that half of the 476 parents polled were concerned about the quality of the air children breathed while at school. And eight out of 10 said they believed a school's poor IAQ can have a direct negative effect on a student's academic performance and health.

Parents also voiced concern about other negative effects of a school's poor IAQ:

  • 70 percent believe a school's poor IAQ can have a negative effect on students' concentration levels.

  • 66 percent believe a school's poor IAQ can have a negative effect on students' academic performance.

  • 61 percent believe a school's poor IAQ can have a negative effect on student absenteeism.

    Slightly more than half reported that their child repeatedly complained about or repeatedly suffered from health problems during or immediately after a day at school. Allergies, runny nose, and coughing were the most often reported health problems.

    "The IAQ industry is closely watching issues relating to both absenteeism and 'presenteeism,' which is when people come to work or school while sick," said Dave Matela of Kimberly-Clark Filtration Products. "Presenteeism not only affects productivity in the workforce, it may also affect a child's ability to learn or concentrate while in school, as our survey suggests."

    Of the parents who reported that their child had repeatedly complained about or repeatedly suffered from respiratory health issues during or immediately after a day at school, 53 percent noted that their child had missed a day or more of school to recuperate, while 34 percent reported that their child had a difficult time concentrating in class because of the symptoms. Nearly half of these parents said they believe that poor IAQ either caused or contributed to these health and related learning/productivity challenges.

    When asked what course of action they would most likely take if they found out or suspected their child's school had a problem with IAQ, 47 percent of the parents indicated they would bring up the issue at a school board meeting or directly to school administrators.

    Publication date: 09/25/2006