ACHRNEWS

How to Get a Job in HVAC, Part 3

September 27, 2011

In my last blog, I described how a student seeking an entry-level position should research and visit companies he or she is interested in working for. You now should have a list of targeted professional HVACR employers and applications completed and ready to return to their offices. Depending on your availability, you need to create a “route” and return to those locations on a regular basis.

The reason that these visits are so important is that HVACR employers are more likely to hire a “familiar face.” HVACR employers do not normally use state or other employment services, and entry-level jobs are not usually listed anywhere. The one common place where they are listed is on HVACR wholesale distributor bulletin boards, and even these posts are usually looking for experienced techs.

However, the return to employers that are looking for experienced techs is very small. If a tech has experience and is successful in his occupation, he is already working somewhere and is happy with his situation (so he’s not looking for different job).

Most HVACR entry level-techs are hired because they are known of by the employer. So become a familiar face.

I tell those seeking jobs that a visit every two weeks is adequate. The next time you return to visit, hand in your application form. Introduce yourself to the reception person again. Express an interest in the company, and ask to meet with the person concerned with hiring. Don't be disappointed if they are not available; HVACR people are very busy. And don't be disappointed if they tell you they are not hiring.

That is often the case. But although they are not hiring now, when the time comes that they need someone, you want to be the one that they are familiar with and think of.

Because when those employers need to hire, they are going to think of someone that has taken the initiative to enroll in a program of study, is interested in their company, and looks professional, clean-cut, well groomed, and reliable.

Generally, professional HVACR employers don't want to hire anyone. They will not increase their payroll until their level of business increases to the point that they either have to turn down work (profits) or they need to hire additional help. This means they are paying attention to business.

Don’t forget that you want to work for a professional. Generally, most HVACR contracting companies are familial companies (family-owned and -operated). This includes all of the small shops and many of the larger operations. But contracting professionalism is not dictated by the size of the company

Remember, you want to be the familiar face that they think of. So repeat the visit exercise on a regular frequency. Run your route, talk to the people, and one of two things will happen. They will either tell you not to return or they will ask you to come in for an interview.

If they tell you not to return, this is good. You won't continue to waste your time and can concentrate on other potentials.

If they ask you to come in for an interview, this is better — get the job! Remember, though, to be successful you must be focused on your career path by completing the educational program. Studying online allows you the flexibility you need to keep the job, maintain your current commitments, and study on your schedule. Check our catalog of online courses at www.hvacredu.net.